Can I give blood?

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Ear infection

Ear canal: you can usually give blood, whether or not you are being treated with local (ointment or ear drops) antibiotics. However, if pus is present or you need to take tablets, you must wait until you have been symptom-free for at least 2 weeks and have not used antibiotics for at least 2 weeks before donating blood.

Middle ear infection: you may donate blood if you have been symptom-free for at least 2 weeks and have not used antibiotics for at least 2 weeks.

Eardrum repair

This may be a problem, depending on the material used. Please contact the Blood Bank about this (0800-5115).

Earlobe perforation (pierced ears)

You may donate blood if this was performed using sterile disposable equipment by a qualified professional. If it is unclear whether these conditions were met, you may donate blood again after 6 months.

Eating

Always eat (and drink) well before donating blood. This reduces the chances of fainting or dizzy spells.

Eczema

Donating is not a problem, so long as the eczema is not inflamed and there is no eczema in the crook of the elbow (where blood must be drawn).

Embolism

Please contact the Blood Bank at 0800 - 5115.

Emphysema

See: Lung Emphysema.

Emphysema (lung)

See ‘Lung Emphysema’

Enlarged prostate (benign prostate hypertrophy)

You may donate blood. You may not donate blood for 6 months following an endoscopy (a procedure with a camera on a tube). An elevated PSA is not a problem for blood donation, so long as there are no signs of cancer.

Epilepsy

Please contact the Blood Bank at 0800 - 5115.

Last edited on: 4 January 2017