Can I give blood?

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Dengue fever

Dengue fever is transmitted by mosquitoes.

Symptoms include: fever, bleeding and severe joint and muscle pain. The infection may also go unnoticed.

If you have had Dengue, you may donate blood 2 weeks after you have recovered.

If you have visited an area where Dengue is common, you may donate blood 4 weeks after leaving the area.

Have you been abroad since your last donation? Take the donor test to check when you can give blood again.

Dentist treatment

You may donate blood if you have only been for a check-up, even if a hook was used.

You may donate blood 1 day after treatment if dental plaque was removed or a cavity was filled.

You may donate blood one week after treatment if you underwent a root canal treatment or a tooth or molar was extracted.

If there is an inflammation, you may donate blood if you have been symptom-free for at least 2 weeks and have not used antibiotics for at least 2 weeks.

Depression

You may donate blood if you have a depression and are using antidepressants, if you feel well. If there are any doubts about your mood during screening, assessment is at the discretion of the donation doctor.

Desensitisation therapy

You may donate blood if you are symptom-free.

Diabetes Mellitus

You may donate blood as long as your glucose levels are well regulated using diets or tablets. If you use injected medication, please contact the Blood Bank (0800-5115). If you develop any complications of diabetes, such as nerve damage (nerve pain), numb fingers or toes, eye or kidney problems, or you need to use insulin, donating blood may represent a risk to you and is no longer allowed; please contact the Blood Bank if this is the case (0800-5115).

Diarrhoera

You may donate blood once you feel well and if you were sick for no more than 2 days and did not have a fever or blood diarrhoea. If your diarrhoea lasted more than 2 days, or you had a fever or blood diarrhoea, you may not donate blood. In this case, you may donate blood if you have been symptom-free for at least 2 weeks and have not used antibiotics for at least 2 weeks.

Diet

You may donate blood if you feel well. You must have eaten on the day you donate blood.

The chances of weight loss are greater if you have lost a lot of weight in a short time (more than 1 kg per week). We recommend waiting to donate blood until your weight is stable.

We also recommend you eat and drink something after giving blood.

Donating blood is not recommended during periods of fasting, such as Ramadan. 

Diphtheria

You may donate blood if you have been symptom-free for at least 2 weeks and have not used antibiotics for at least 2 weeks.

Dizziness

Donating blood can sometimes cause dizziness, usually described as a feeling of light-headedness or fainting tendency. If you already feel this way before donating blood, for example when standing up, you should wait to donate blood or should avoid donating blood, as you will have a greater risk of fainting. Discuss this with the donation assistant during screening if necessary.

Donation frequency

Blood: maximum 3 times per year for women maximum 5 times per year for men.

Plasmapheresis: maximum 26 times per year. no distinction is made between men and women.

Drugs

You may not donate blood if you are addicted or if addiction is suspected due to a risk of bloodborne infectious diseases.

You may not be a blood donor if you have ever used injection drugs. Even if it was only once and/or a long time ago.

You may only give blood 1 year after snorting cocaine. This means you may not donate blood if you use cocaine once per year or more often.

You may not give blood if you are under the influence of any other drugs.

Last edited on: 4 January 2017